Motorola will sell its first foldable phone likely the Razr this summer

first_img Tags Now playing: Watch this: See All More from MWC 2019 May 13 • Galaxy S10E vs. iPhone XR: Every spec compared 35 Photos The device is almost certainly a revival of the Razr brand, which The Wall Street Journal reported would be coming back with a $1,500 price tag. Engadget on Wednesday confirmed that the phone was coming.The summer launch puts it squarely in between the launch of the Galaxy Fold, slated for April 26, and the Mate X, which will launch around the middle of the year, and further highlights the burgeoning trend of foldable phones. The devices garnered tons of buzz and were the talk of a reinvigorated MWC at a time when interest in phones were starting to mature.Unlike the Galaxy Fold or Mate X, which fold out into larger displays, the Razr’s design, based on schematics from a patent filing discovered by blog 91Mobiles, flips down into a smaller device like the original Razr. News • Forget the Galaxy Fold and Mate X, the Motorola Razr is the foldable phone to beat Phones The design has some advantages, including protection of the display once it’s folded down. If it mimics the original phone, it’ll be much more compact too. But it’s unclear if consumers want to fold away their display. Samsung and Huawei are banking on people preferring the option of the larger display. The original Razr was one of the most recognizable brands and helped drive Motorola’s success for years during the flip phone era. The ultra-thin phone first started off at the then-outrageous price of $500 as an exclusive phone for Cingular Wireless (now AT&T.) It was one of the most successful phones in history, selling more than 50 million units within two years of its debut.Motorola, however, couldn’t capitalize on the success of the Razr, and fell further behind as the industry moved on to more sophisticated phones. Google purchased Motorola in 2012, and then resold it two years later to Lenovo. Motorola has made its mark largely on well-outfitted budget phones like the Moto G franchise and its Moto Z franchise, which is upgradable to 5G via a Moto Mod attachment.Now, Lenovo has a chance to reinvigorate the Motorola brand with the Razr once more.The story originally published on Feb. 27 at 5:25 p.m. PT. Update, Feb. 28 at 4 a.m. PT: To include additional details on prior phones.  Galaxy Fold vs. Huawei Mate X: CNET editors react $146 Review • Motorola Razr V3xx Share your voice • Mentioned Above Motorola Special Edition Black Razr V3 (AT&T) See itcenter_img Mobile World Congress 2019 Huawei Mate X triple threat: Foldable phone with 5G, lots of cameras Motorola Razr Mobile World Congress 2019 Jun 29 • Galaxy S10 5G, OnePlus 7 Pro LG V50 ThinQ 5G: Why you shouldn’t rush to buy a 5G phone CNET may get a commission from retail offers. 9:54 Comments Galaxy Fold vs. Huawei Mate X: Battle of the foldable phones Galaxy S10 Plus ongoing review Microsoft’s HoloLens 2 feels like practical magic Mobile World Congress 2019 Jul 9 • Killer cameras and battery life might meet their match in the Note 10 Preview • Motorola Razr Jun 1 • The Nubia Alpha looks like either a house arrest bracelet or Batman’s phone 8 reading • Motorola will sell its first foldable phone, likely the Razr, this summer Images from a design patent filed by Motorola in 2017. The filing went public in December. Motorola – Photo illustration by Ian Knighton/CNET Motorola is jumping into foldable phones. And it’s likely doing it with one of the most iconic names in the business. Motorola, a unit of Chinese consumer electronics giant Lenovo, plans to sell its foldable smartphone in the summer, according to a person familiar with the company’s plans. The person said the design would be unlike the Samsung Galaxy Fold, which debuted last week, or the Huawei Mate X, which was shown off at the MWC Barcelona show on Sunday. Lenovo Motorola Samsunglast_img read more

This Gadget Will Let You 3D Print in Nutella

first_img 2 min read Once upon a time, serving bananas flambé — complete with fire leaping out of the pan — was an impressive way to end a dinner party. But soon, there could be an even crazier option: bringing your desktop 3-D printer to the table and serving up 3-D printed dessert made out of Nutella.Waterloo, Canada-based company Structur3D Printing has created a printer attachment called a “paste extruder” that works with most 3-D printer models and allows makers to create 3-D printed items with a variety of soft materials.Related: With $6.4 Million in New Funding, This 3-D Printed Insole Maker Is Looking HotA Kickstarter campaign for the tool launched today and has already surpassed its initial financial target. The team was hoping to raise $30,000 Canadian dollars (CAD) and, as of 2 p.m. ET, the team had already raised more than $32,500 CAD.The company intends to use the funds to produce at least 100 paste extruder units.With the attachment, which you get with a $249 CAD pledge to the campaign, you can print objects with silicone, polyurethane, wood filler, clay, ceramics, icing sugar, Nutella or conductive paint. The goal is to give inventors and makers the ability to use more than just plastic in their existing 3-D printers, allowing them to be more creative and save money as they experiment with prototypes. The plastic filament typically required in first generation 3-D printers is expensive.Related: Beyond Novelty: Architects in Amsterdam Are 3-D Printing an Entire House“There have been 3-D printers specifically designed to print different types of food or silicone. Our product is different, because we’re allowing you to make use of the printer you already have at home,” the Kickstarter campaign reads.The Discov3ry paste extruder is compatible with desktop 3-D Printers manufactured by MakerBot, Ultimaker and printrbot, among other popular brands.Related: 3-D Printers Take a Step Toward the MainstreamCheck out the video embedded below of the Discov3ry paste extruder being used with Nutella. Growing a business sometimes requires thinking outside the box. Free Webinar | Sept. 9: The Entrepreneur’s Playbook for Going Globalcenter_img June 10, 2014 Register Now »last_img read more