Texas Wages Campaign to Preserve Its Installations

first_imgTexas Gov. Greg Abbott (R) is counting on a pool of $30 million approved by the Legislature earlier this year to prevent the loss of any of the state’s 15 installations in a future BRAC round as well as strengthen some by attracting new missions.The governor’s Texas Military Preparedness Commission meets next month to review grant applications from communities, which can collect up to $5 million each over the state’s 2016-17 fiscal biennium. Grants are capped at $2.5 million yearly.“We have so much to offer as a state in the context of national security that you can’t duplicate,” Commission Chairman Paul Paine told the Fort Worth Star-Telegram. “The installations in Texas all have very high national security value,” said Paine, a former commander at Naval Air Station (NAS) Fort Worth.The host communities for NAS Fort Worth, a joint reserve base that grew out of the closure of Carswell Air Force Base, hope to secure $4.5 million to improve access into the facility’s east gate.“We want to be prepared if there is” another BRAC round, said Fort Worth Councilman Jungus Jordan, president of the Texas Mayors of Military Communities, the main group that persuaded state lawmakers to allocate the grant money.“We don’t have Fort in front of our name by accident. We’re a military town. We will always be a military town,” Jordan said.Leaders in the state’s other defense communities also are positioning neighboring installations for a new round of base closures. “It’s not a matter of if another BRAC will happen; it is when,” said Bob Murdock, director of San Antonio’s Office of Military Affairs.Nevertheless, the state’s installations should fare well in a future round, according to defense analyst Loren Thompson, CEO at the nonprofit Lexington Institute.“Texas doesn’t have a lot to fear from base closures,” Thompson told the Star-Telegram. “Nobody is going to close a place like Fort Hood or the Army depot in Corpus Christi.” Dan Cohen AUTHORlast_img read more

Final Fantasy 7 Remake Release date Xbox rumors and everything else we

first_imgIf you’ve never played the original or weren’t around at the time of its 1997 release, you may be asking…What’s the deal with Final Fantasy 7? Final Fantasy is the most famous RPG franchise ever, and Final Fantasy 7 is the most famous Final Fantasy game ever. It’s sold 11 million units, according to creator Square Enix, making it the highest-selling game in the franchise. For reference, 2016’s Final Fantasy 15, which was a huge success, stands at around 8.4 million shipped.Final Fantasy was also a smash hit among critics, holding a 9.2 rating on Metacritic. GameSpot, our sister site, gave it a 9.5 upon release.It may seem crazy looking at it now, but Final Fantasy 7 was a technological masterclass in 1997. Cinematic cutscenes were modelled in full-motion video, and the blocky 3D models moved around in pre-rendered environments that blew minds at the time.ff7-battle-3-scale-800-700You see this? These graphics were mind blowing. Square Enix Then there’s the story. In the beginning, the bad guy is Shinra Corporation, an electricity company that mines Mako, the Lifestream of the planet, slowly corroding the world in the process. They have their own military force, SOLDIER, of which Cloud Strife is a former member. Cloud begins the game as a mercenary, hired by Barrett, head of the Midgar-based AVALANCHE eco-terrorist group, for a mission to blow up a set of Mako reactors.  Once we’re introduced to Sephiroth, though, everything changes. Sephiroth is a bad dude. He’s also a former SOLDIER member, the most elite fighter to ever join the force’s ranks, but was presumed dead until he resurfaces. Once he rocks up, the game becomes a hunt for Sephiroth, world’s baddest man and one of gaming’s most iconic villains. Combine an illustrious cast of heroes, like Vincent, Tifa and Aerith, with an expansive world and a deep battle system, and it becomes easy to understand why Final Fantasy 7 has had such an enduring legacy.One last plot note: If you haven’t played the original, do not read up on its story. You’ll have one of gaming’s most famous moments spoiled.Why do people want a remake?People have had a thirst for a Final Fantasy 7 Remake thanks to the efforts of Square Enix itself. The company teamed up with Sony in 2005 to give fans a huge tease. At E3, when Sony was unveiling its PlayStation 3 for the first time, this “technical demo” was shown: The action is from the first segment of the game, where Cloud and Barrett attempt to destroy a Mako reactor. The combat looks similar to how it did in the reveal trailer all those years ago, but menus have been updated and character designs tweaked. (Cloud has been hitting the gym, apparently.) Details on the next PlayStation, Twitter combats abuse The 17 most anticipated video games of 2019 New era, new storyIn another significant structural change from the original, Final Fantasy 7 Remake is to be segmented in at least two instalments. In 2015, producer Yoshinori Kitase said the game would be broken into “multiple” instalments, each of which will be the size of Final Fantasy 13. It appears those parts might be even bigger than that: Part one, releasing March 2, 2020, will span two Blu-ray discs, Kitase said at E3.There’s no word on when the second part will launch, and Square Enix says they’re still considering how many instalments the story will be told over. There’s some speculation, based on comments from Square Enix CEO Yosuke Matsuda, that subsequent parts could be released on both PlayStation 4 and 5. It sounds like the team is recreating the hell out of this game, as Director Tetsuya Nomura and Kitase, in the few interviews they’ve done, make reference to its immense scale. Another clear theme: The duo aren’t interested in a straight remake. The changes they’re making aren’t just to the combat, or to the vastness of the world, but to the story as well.”I don’t want the remake to end as something solely nostalgic. I want to get the fans of the original version excited,” Kitase said to Dengaki, translated by Gematsu. “We’ll be making adjustments to the story with this thought in mind.”Nomura added to this, enigmatically saying, “I hope that [fans of the original] can be surprised once again.” Someone took the “Cloud’s arms look weird and scrawny” criticism from the first trailer at heart! pic.twitter.com/ftRohMqo3k— Ismael Bergara (@Calavera145) May 9, 2019 Now playing: Watch this: 17 Photos What about Xbox One?In early July, Xbox Germany advertised a March 3, 2020 release date for an Xbox One version of Final Fantasy 7 Remake. Prior to that, it was thought that the game was exclusive to PlayStation 4. Unfortunately for Xbox One owners, it looks like it still is. “As previously announced, Final Fantasy 7 Remake will be released for the PlayStation 4 on March 3, 2020,” the Square Enix representative would say in a statement. “We have no plans for other platforms.” A member of Xbox Germany’s marketing team tweeted: “We did an internal mistake in the Social Team. We took the video off immediately. Sorry, no announcement on our side. Big apologies for this.”It’s certainly possible that there’s an Xbox version yet to be announced, but it’s also very possible that this was just a mistake.  Cloud in Final Fantasy 7 Remake. Square Enix When I think of Final Fantasy 7 Remake, I think of its announcement at E3 2015. I remember watching it at my desk, quickly spiralling into hysterics as it became evident the onscreen trailer was for a Final Fantasy 7 Remake. It was a big day. It wasn’t just me who was excited, many more were losing it. Now, we’re within a year of the enigmatic game hitting store shelves.After over a decade of anticipation and then years of secrecy, Square Enix showed the world a whole lot of Final Fantasy 7 Remake at E3 back in June. We know a lot, including the part one release date (March 3, 2020) and how the combat system will work, but there’s still a lot we don’t know. When the second part of the game will be released, or even how many instalments there will be, still eludes us.If you’re catching up from complete ignorance, here’s a quick summary:Final Fantasy 7 Remake is a multi-part game. The instalments will be released separately.Final Fantasy 7 Remake part one hits the PlayStation 4 on March 3, 2020.The first part will take place entirely in Midgar.The new combat system combines real-time and turn-based elements.The game will be significantly different from the original, including story points. Take a much closer look at Aerith, Cloud and Barret as they appear in #FinalFantasy VII Remake…More to come in June. #FF7R pic.twitter.com/zDQYV0XT7J— FINAL FANTASY (@FinalFantasy) May 11, 2019 1:25 Comments Share your voice Culture Gaming Sony Square Those bastards showed us what Final Fantasy’s intro would look like on the PlayStation 3 when they had no intention of pulling through. Imagine George Lucas shooting a trailer for a Star Wars: A New Hope remake, flush with 2019-level cinematics and cinematography, but saying that it was only a demo and that no actual release was planed. That’s how Final Fantasy buffs felt for 10 years. Teased and unloved — until E3 2015.What should I play before Remake?If you haven’t played the original Final Fantasy 7 yet, at this point, it’s best to just wait until Remake hits on March 3, 2020.Although, there are a bunch of other Final Fantasy 7 spin-offs out there. These include Crisis Core: Final Fantasy 7, Dirge of Cerberus: Final Fantasy 7, as well as a film, Final Fantasy 7: Advent Children.You can skip almost all of these. Dirge of Cerberus was a poorly-received game set after the original, and it follows Vincent, one of the two secret characters in Final Fantasy 7. Advent Children is cool, as far as video game movies go, but it’s also set after the original game, so it won’t make much sense.That said, Crisis Core: Final Fantasy 7 was a fantastic game. It’s a prequel, following Zack Fair, who was Cloud’s mentor in SOLDIER. Playing it won’t spoil much of Final Fantasy 7’s story, so it’s absolutely worth doing. The downside? It’s only available on PSP, so you’ll need one of those lying around.crisis-core-902x507Crisis Core: Final Fantasy 7 was great, but it’s only playable on PSP. Other Final Fantasy 7 spin-off titles aren’t worth fussing over. Square Enix No need to wait your turnThe remake will be drastically different to the original. That’s immediately evident in the combat: While Final Fantasy 7 was completely turn based, Final Fantasy 7 Remake is a real-time action game with turn based elements. Pressing the Square button will make Cloud swing his buster sword, and there will be similar real-time commands for dodging and blocking. As you battle enemies, your Action Time Bar (ATB) builds up. Once full, you can slow the action down to Tactical Mode, essentially bullet time, from which you can cast magic, use items or unleash Limit Breaks. However, it was also noted that players who prefer faster-paced combat can eschew this by assigning shortcuts to these actions on a menu at the bottom left on the screen, which makes the action more Kingdom Hearts-esque.You’ll be able to control more than just Cloud, though. With a press of a button you can switch to controlling other party members, with Square Enix showing off both Barrett and Tifa at E3. It seems like this is where some strategy will come in, as it was noted by Square Enix that certain characters are better to control to fight certain enemies, like Barrett against long-distance foes. Check a demo on the combat below. 7 Tagslast_img read more

UMD Outlines Faults as Durkin Awaits Fate

first_imgBy Mark F. Gray, Special to the AFROWhen damning information is released to the public, a professional public relations strategy has always been able to make the announcement on a late Friday afternoon heading into the weekend when the audience is distracted.  As the University of Maryland released the results of their investigation into the death of Jordan McNair on the precipice of last weekend, there was an admission of guilt to what was already known, but those involved in the fatal chain of events have yet to be held accountable.After accepting its negligence and culpability in the McNair tragedy, the University announced the results of their commissioned investigation which confirmed they didn’t react properly to his symptoms and waited too long to begin what could’ve been life-saving treatment.  The 74-page report prepared by Dr. Ron Walters, head of the sports medicine consulting firm Walters, affirmed numerous protocols weren’t followed.UMD admitted guilt in the death of Jordan McNair, who died of heatstroke in June.  (Courtesy Photo)It was confirmed that Maryland’s athletic training was tardy when initiating treatment and they waited at least one hour before calling 911 for help.  After McNair’s cramps and exhaustion were first reported at 4:53 p.m. he wasn’t taken to the football field house to begin treatment until around 5:20 p.m. The trainers didn’t call the head physician, who told them to call 911 at 5:55 p.m., which was more than an hour after McNair first started showing symptoms on the field.  Another 911 call went out at 6:02 p.m. before McNair left for the hospital in an ambulance at 6:27 p.m.Perhaps the most glaring of the missed protocols was there were no cold water immersion tanks on site because practice was moved on May 29 from Maryland Stadium to their practice field late.  The absence of this procedure didn’t allow the athletic training staff to administer cold water immersion treatment at the first sign of McNair’s physical distress.  This practice is common to immediately bring the body temperature down, which would have stabilized the symptoms until first responders arrived.Walters’ report confirmed what had been previously reported by ESPN. When conditioning drills began at 4:15pm there were water hydration stations placed around the practice fields. Those drills – 10 110 yard sprints – saw McNair finish the first seven in normal time but struggle through the final three.  While his teammates helped the former McDonogh star finish his drills he was admonished by football trainer Wes Robinson who told them to, “drag his ass across the field” as he began laboring.Under Robinson’s watch, Maryland’s training staff didn’t begin treating McNair until almost 5 p.m.  They never immersed him in the cold tubs, instead choosing to try and cool him down by using cold towels all over his body since they feared drowning because of his size.  The trainers didn’t begin any form of aggressive treatment for approximately 30 minutes after his symptoms began which progressively got worse.“Failure to rapidly recognize exertional heat illness is a concern” the report said. “The lack of recognition and assessment of the severity of the event delayed cooling the patient in a timely manner.”The report doesn’t exclude head coach D.J. Durkin from culpability, yet it doesn’t hold him accountable either.  The professional fate of Durkin and Robinson still hang in the balance as they remain on administrative leave while another examination by the Board of Regents continues into what ESPN dubbed a “toxic culture.”However, as these investigations continue, the optics continue making the University look bad. The wait for the resolution only compounds the damage when it appears they must move on from Durkin sooner than later.last_img read more