Clarke insists Green was not fouled

first_imgWest Brom manager Steve Clarke said he did not believe QPR keeper Rob Green was fouled for Albion’s second goal at Loftus Road.The Baggies’ 2-1 win sent Rangers back to the bottom of the table and they were deserved winners.Green felt he was impeded by Marc Antoine-Fortune as he palmed the ball into his own net.But Clarke said: “I didn’t think it was a foul. I saw it again on video. Rob had a chance to punch it and didn’t and it ended up in the net.”More reaction to follow.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 Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

Timeline: A look back at Antonio Brown’s wild ride with the Raiders

first_imgThe Antonio Brown experience has come and gone, leaving Raider Nation (heck, most of the NFL) wondering, “What just happened?”Brown was a Raider for 181 days, and while his stint in Silver and Black was short – he never played in a game and missed most of the practices – it more than made up for in can’t-look-away moments.Things moved pretty fast from the March 10 blockbuster trade that brought in the megawatt star wide receiver from the Steelers until the Raiders finally gave up and released …last_img

Friday Funnies: Evo-Comics

first_imgNot every Darwinian explanation is useless. Some of them can function as entertainment.“Human ancestors had tentacles.” Your great-great-….-grandparents were frond-like Ediacaran creatures, says PhysOrg. “By virtue of the fact that there are tentacles among the two main taxons of bilaterally symmetrical animals, it is logical to assume that the common ancestor also had them,” a Muscovite evolutionist says, displaying her grasp of logic. “It means that the common ancestor of chordate animals, including people, also had tentacles.” And the common ancestor of the Millennium Falcon is Lego blocks, too; no intelligence allowed.“Ocean bottom microbes are our long-lost relatives.” Ever traced your family tree with software? Perhaps you didn’t go back far enough, or a single-celled organism on the sea floor would be in it. New Scientist is raving over the thrill of discovering our long-lost relatives. “SO THAT’S where they’ve been hiding. An entirely new group of organisms discovered at the bottom of the Arctic Ocean are our closest simple-celled relatives ever found.” Some of us look just like them, too: round, and transporting little bubble-like vesicles. Reaction to this “truly remarkable, landmark discovery” varies from mild skepticism to “we were really blown away” by it. Speaking of their brains, that may be true. Giving it a name (“Loki”) might help (BBC News). Even the venerable AAAS crashed this party.“Tortoise approach works best—even for evolution.”  PhysOrg starts this comic with silhouetted figures from the Human March of Progress from ape to man. (Didn’t Henry Gee blow that icon away over a decade ago?—see 12/14/02). Speaking of bacteria again, the article begins, “When it comes to winning evolutionary fitness races, the tortoise once again prevails over the hare.” It’s just about which microbes can migrate faster than others, but the authors justify it with profound promises: “Understanding this effect is important, especially for understanding the evolution of disease, reducing the evolution of antibiotic resistance and predicting how populations respond to climate change.” Maybe that last appeal will bring in more funding.“Researchers discover missing link in the evolution of complex cells.” Ah, the “missing link” meme has not outworn its usefulness, even though orthogenesis is long dead as a mode of evolution. We’re just evolved microbes, the article from Uppsala University begins: “The study provides a new understanding of how, billions of years ago, the complex cell types that comprise plants, fungi, but also animals and humans, evolved from simple microbes.”“‘Dino-chickens’ reveal how the beak was born.” It’s a bird; it’s a dinosaur; it’s dino-chicken! Nature joins all the other news outlets (e.g., PhysOrg) that jumped onto an announcement that evolutionists at the U of Chicago created birds with deformed beaks by altering their genes, claiming the result was a throwback to dinosaur days. Beak air-full. “We’re never going back to the actual dino-chicken or whatever it is,” one of the Darwinians admitted. Whatever it was, Casey Luskin responded to this claim in Evolution News & Views.“Watch: Cave-Climbing Fish Found—Is It Evolution in Action?” A catfish that can climb cave walls for a bit is certainly a novelty, but is it evolution? National Geographic teases readers with that possibility. “Evolution is a process that’s constantly at work,” one Darwinian says. The fish may become adapted to the “dark side” of cave life. “It’s an exciting possibility,” he says. Are you excited? Watch! Let’s see if the fish evolves the ability hammer pitons into the rock.“Lower back pain linked to chimpanzee spine shape.” Your inner chimp is responsible for your back pain, the BBC News claims. Apparently, though, not all of us are fully evolved: “Evolution is not perfect, so over many thousands of years humans have not all adapted in the same way.” No one seems to have asked if the chimpanzees have lower back pain, living with that posture all the time.“Malaria continues to select for sickle cell trait in Central Africa.” Here’s the all-powerful force of natural selection, that brought forth humans from the womb of microbes, at work, according to PNAS: “this study shows that P. falciparum malaria continues to exert strong selective pressure in favor of the sickle cell allele.” Perhaps this is how the FBI exerts strong selective pressure in favor of criminals with no fingerprints.“From James Taylor to Taylor Swift: Music evolves like biological organisms.” You may not (or may) realize it, but music is the product of blind, unguided processes of mutation and selection, according to Science Magazine. “In the early 1990s, rap took over the radio: Songs by Snoop Dogg and Jay Z played everywhere,” John Bohannon writes. “Was this a musical revolution or merely the result of a gradual change in tastes over time? Researchers say they’re now able to answer such questions, thanks to the largest data-driven study of pop music ever undertaken. Applying evolutionary theory to this data set, they say, could settle several debates that have raged over pop music for decades.” Your tax dollars at work. Evolutionists treated “the statistical traits shared among songs like biological traits” and found, surprisingly, that music does not evolve by Darwinian gradualism. Bohannon’s ending paragraph is a classic:“This is rigorous,” says Jean-Baptiste Michel, a data scientist at Harvard University and Palantir Technologies, which is headquartered in Palo Alto, California, who was lead author of a 2010 Science paper that kicked off the study of culture through massive data sets. “More researchers need to take this approach.” One of the findings that stands out, he says, is that pop music shows a pattern from biological evolution known as punctuated equilibrium, in which periods of gradual change are separated by explosions of complexity. The most famous example in geological history is the Cambrian explosion, a sudden, massive increase in biodiversity in the fossil record 542 million years ago. “There are differences, of course,” he says, “since biological evolution has the direct parent-offspring relationship, and we don’t know the mechanisms even in biology. So we have to be careful.“Senator Tom Coburn, we need you back! (10/29/14)Refresher course: For those who might be laughing at all this, Live Science just walked in like a stern teacher whacking the ruler on the desk, bringing the students to order. “Despite the wealth of evidence from the fossil record, genetics and other fields of science, some people still question its validity,” Ker Than writes, after telling a whale of a tale about whale evolution. Who could these people possibly be? “Some politicians and religious leaders denounce the theory, invoking a higher being as a designer to explain the complex world of living things, especially humans.” Then his capstone argument is that all scientists agree evolution is true. Say—what’s that the teacher drew on the blackboard? Why, of course; it’s the March of Man, exhibit A as proof of evolution. (Visited 445 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0 Ah, yes. We hope you laughed yourself silly with the Friday Funnies. Notice a few things. (1) If there was ever any doubt that evolutionists teach microbes-to-man evolution, the evidence is right there in the first four examples. (2) Icons of evolution, like the March of Man, never die, even decades after they are exposed as frauds.  (3) Darwinians can stare falsification (like the Cambrian Explosion) in the face and still say, “It evolved.” (4) The most prestigious universities and scientific institutions, like the National Academy of Sciences and the American Association for the Advancement of Science are accomplices in this folly.The continued barrage of evolutionary silliness is proof we’re not laughing loud enough. Big Science and Big Media is infected with incompetent, illogical, arrogant Darwinian boobs. Shame would be a good first step in cleaning house.last_img read more

Did corn fungicides pay in 2016?

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest As farmers around the state scouted their withering corn fields this summer, the application of fungicides seemed like a waste of money. Some are now second-guessing that decision.“I should have done a whole lot more fungicides,” said Jeremy Goyings, who farms in Paulding County. “We didn’t want to throw more money at what looked like a 100-bushel corn crop at the time, but it turns out we should have. There were a lot of excellent results with fungicides in this area. It was a little variety specific and those varieties that were more disease susceptible saw more benefit. It drives home the point that we need to be pushing harder on the fungicides on the corn. I think there is money to be made with more blanket applications. There may be years that it does not have that kind of yield benefit, but there are years where it does pay and you don’t want to miss out on it. The plant health is important. Keeping that corn alive a little longer helped capture the larger kernel size.”Jon Miller shared the same regrets in Fairfield County.“Talking to neighbors, it seems like fungicide really paid for itself this year,” Miller said. “I think we’ll probably do more fungicide next year because of how this year went. It was so dry and we didn’t see the disease but there was some yield benefit. With the later rains it might have really helped.”The problem is that the plant health benefits in corn are challenging to quantify and document, particularly when prices are low.“I have heard from some growers and field agronomists about the plant health benefits of fungicides this year. They didn’t have the disease pressure and they are seeing higher yields, but they are also seeing much higher moisture corn,” said Peter Thomison, Ohio State University Extension corn specialist. “Plant health and fungicides are a touchy issue. I have done work with this, along with plant pathologists, and it is frustrating. We have done the work for several years and not seen any benefits. Then, lo and behold, we have a year like this and we see a response. It would be nice if we knew under what conditions it worked. It is like shooting dice. You never know the year you’re going to see the benefits of these fungicides. When corn is $7 or $8 you can put it on as a risk management tool, but when corn is $3.50 it is a different story. The speculation is that the longer you keep that corn green, the more opportunity you have to extend the filling period for corn. If you kept that canopy alive longer this year it may have translated into higher yields with the rains.”last_img read more

Scottish cities hope to find big bucks to become smarter

first_imgThe Scottish Cities Alliance (SCA) has revealed it brought £100 million ($122 million) into the country’s economy over the last 18 months, through promotion of Scotland’s economic potential to foreign investors.It aims to promote £7.5 billion ($9.1 billion) of investment opportunities in the next year, focusing on low-carbon, hydrogen, and smart city programs in Scotland’s major cities.See Also: City of Boston calls for IoT projects grounded in reality“We believe that by attracting investment to Scotland’s cities, using smart cities, hydrogen and low carbon programs, we will make the cities some of the most desirable and sustainable places to live and work in the world,” said councillor Andrew Burns, chair of the SCA.The SCA revealed earlier in December that smart city programs adopted by Scotland’s seven major cities will use technologies to make services more efficient. This includes LED street lighting, Wi-Fi connected trash bins, and healthcare provisions.Glasgow network a new smart city sandboxA consortium of communications firms announced in July plans to create a large Internet of Things (IoT) network in Glasgow, one of the first major signs that Scotland could be a place for tech firms to test and deploy emerging technologies.Scotland has been thrown into turmoil by the UK’s vote to leave the European Union, with some investors worried that the country will lose access to the single market. The Scottish National Party has pushed Westminster to fight for a deal that includes single market access, and has warned that losing this may result in a second referendum.That panic does not appear to be hitting the tech scene, although as formal negotiations start, Scotland might start to feel the pinch. The SCA did not comment on Brexit and the implications it may have on tech investment in Scotland. Tags:#hydrogen#low carbon#Scotland#Scottish Cities Alliance#Smart Cities#smart city Dahn Tamir For Self-Driving Systems, Infrastructure and In… Related Posts center_img How Connected Communities Can Bolster Your Busi… Surveillance at the Heart of Smart Cities How IoT Will Play an Important Role in Traffic …last_img read more

How to Improve Your Confidence as a Consultative Salesperson

first_img Get the Free eBook! Learn how to sell without a sales manager. Download my free eBook! You need to make sales. You need help now. We’ve got you covered. This eBook will help you Seize Your Sales Destiny, with or without a manager. Download Now Professional salespeople want—and need—to be consultative. The word “consultative” means that one provides advice and recommendations, and it includes the idea that one possess the business acumen and situational knowledge (or experience) to dispense their guidance. Here are a few ideas that will improve your confidence as a consultative salesperson.Increase Your CompetenceA large part of the confidence you need to be a consultative salesperson begins and ends with your competence. A good many salespeople mistakenly believe consultative means they avoid hard sell, high-pressure approaches and ask good questions. While the approach matters, it doesn’t replace the need to be competent.You improve your competence by becoming a subject matter expert in your field. There is no doubt that it takes time to gain the experience you need to be competent here, but the time it takes to gain the insights and ideas can through intentionally working to become a subject matter expert. What was the last book you read on sales? What was the last book or long-form article you read about the state of your industry?As much as you need to work to become a subject matter expert in your field, you also have to become a subject matter expert in the challenges your prospective clients face and how you best resolve them. This is what consultative salespeople do, after all. Are you writing down the problems—especially the systemic ones—your prospects are struggling with now? Are you making careful notes on what works, when it works, and why it works?Competency is found on the other side of this work.Focus on Larger, Strategic OutcomesIt is too easy to look for “pain points” or “dissatisfaction” as an entry point to developing a case for your product or service. It is something altogether different to focus on the more substantial, more strategic outcomes your dream client should pursue and make a more significant case for change.The first chapter in Eat Their Lunch: Winning Customers Away From Your Competition includes a framework outlining the four levels of value a salesperson or sales organization can create. The lowest level of value, while still critically important, is the value in your product. The highest level is the strategic value you create. Your product is not advice, eliminating that as something that makes one consultative. Offering the advice on how better achieve strategic outcomes is at the other end of this continuum, the consultative side.Control the ProcessIt is difficult to be consultative without controlling the process. The contacts you work with often want to skip past the conversations necessary for a good decision, and they just as often try to avoid making some of the commitments they need to make to produce the results they need. Believing your contacts know best what needs to happen and when it needs to happen is to give up a consultative approach.Here we shift back to competence. Who has more experience helping people make the decision your dream client is making? Who has helped more people and companies produce the result your prospective client needs now? How could they possibly know more than you, especially when they buy what you sell so infrequently in contrast to how often you and your company helps your clients with the same outcomes.None of this is to say that your contacts don’t know their company and their situation better than you, but to make the point that your experience with hundreds of clients gives you a different level of experience, and one that can help shape their future experience. If you are consultative, you need to know how to help your client go from opportunity to execution to result.last_img read more

An Inbound Marketer’s Introduction to Twitter Lists

first_img , soldering list on Twitter, your business will have one more way get found by prospects. lists. Watch For example, say you’re interested in following the people at HubSpot. There are over 100 of us here now, so it’s a lot of work to follow us all individually. Now, instead of following each of us, you can go to our HubSpotters list page  — Inbound Marketing Stars Lists are collections of Twitter users that you can follow all at once, instead of one by one. They’re Employees twitter.com/HubSpot/inbound-marketing-stars lists are great places to find out more about HubSpot. In case you missed the news last week, Twitter solder paste (1) Start following a few popular lists. , –Lists are a new tool. They’re going to evolve, and the best practices for using them as marketing tools will also evolve. In order to get the most out of them you should keep trying new ways of using them. Customers and the one we’ve setup at HubSpot . .  ? Once you’re created a few great lists, share them with your network. Post them on Twitter. Post them on Listorious. Post them on your blog. When you share your list, make sure you share your list page. The URL should look something like this:  Inbound Marketing News Watch this free webinar to learn everything you need to know about marketing with Twitter Lists. You’ll find out how Twitter list can be useful to marketers and how to get started with them. There are lots of ways to become a thought leader, and lists augment them all. If you sell soldering supplies and you set up Lists will help companies solidify thought leadership. THE  A key part of marketing today is using search, social media and content to establish yourself as the thought leader in your industry — whether it’s  — and follow us all at once. twitter.com/HubSpot/hubspotters (4) Keep experimenting with lists. is a great place to browse Twitter lists. I’m also a fan of why should you or any other marketer care What have you learned about Twitter lists? Let us know in the comments below. Lists will make companies more transparent. , the internal conversations of your company will become more transparent. That will give prospects another way get to know your company and to build trust, which will leads to more sales. One last note: Keep in mind that lists aren’t perfect right now. It’s very hard to add people to them. You can’t change the names. It’s hard to browse a lot of them. But this doesn’t mean you should ignore them. They represent a significant change in the way Twitter works — and, increasingly, that means a significant change in the way marketers do their jobs.  Successful inbound marketers know that transparency builds sales. It builds trust, which makes deals easier to close. Here’s how: Go to your Twitter home page. In the right-hand column, about halfway down the page, you should see a “New List” option. Click this and you’ll see instructions that will help you create a new list. Try to create a descriptive, unique name. And make sure you select the “Public” option. changing the way people use Twitter Partners Our If your company sets up a list of all employees using Twitter like  (2) Start building your own lists. New York Times lists Twitter Marketing Topics: golf training How to Get Started With Lists ,  (3) Share your lists. — Listorious Once you’ve create the list, start adding people to it. This can be time consuming. Right now the best way is to go to the profile of the user you want to add, then click the white lists tab above the user’s updates. You’ll see your new list in the pulldown.  or something else.  What’s a list — and  Once you take a look at few lists, jump in and build your own. . Don’t share the page you use to manage your list. and Free Twitter Lists Webinar: Everything You Need to Know About Twitter Lists announced a major new feature: , and they’re set to become an important new tool for inbound marketers. the free webinar now There are at least two ways that lists will become important tools for marketers: Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlack list are great places to find out more about inbound marketing. The fencing Originally published Nov 2, 2009 10:08:00 AM, updated October 20 2016last_img read more

Big Bird Shows Marketers the RIGHT Way to Newsjack the Presidential Debates

first_img Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlack Originally published Oct 5, 2012 1:07:00 PM, updated October 01 2013 The tweet, “PBS is trusted, valued and essential. See why at valuepbs.org. (please retweet!)” encourages people to go check out their website that educates readers on why PBS is such a valuable organization. Here’s a snippet: Why The Big Bird Newsjack is AwesomeFirst of all, I love that this newsjack considered the proper channel. The bulk of the backlash to Romney’s Big Bird comment took place on Twitter … so what better place for PBS to headquarter their newsjack? They also took a cue from our resident social media scientist Dan Zarrella and included the copy “please retweet,” realizing the importance of making this newsjack of theirs go viral on Twitter. They even included social sharing buttons — which data shows lead to 7X more mentions — on the webpage they direct people towards! (Which, as of writing this post, has received over 7,000 shares on Twitter alone.)But it’s more than just the proper channel that makes this newsjack great. I love that the call-to-action in the tweet points towards educational content. And that content isn’t just a large, dense chunk of text. When you look at that page, you see that they actually invested the time to come up with really interesting statistics that help prove the value PBS has as an organization — the value they have to the reader. They’ve really stepped up their visual content game, too, with data visualizations and even a video playing in the top right corner of the page. They also recognized the importance of aligning that page with their tweet, which is why you see the same copy occupying the heading of the page as you see in the tweet!But there’s something about this newsjack that is pretty amazing besides the excellent marketing execution. I think there’s a bit of a statement we marketers can take away from the fact that a non-profit organization is:1) Investing money in Twitter ads2) NewsjackingPBS is showing that they not only believe in social media as a powerful marketing tool, but they’re willing to experiment with “scarier” new things like Twitter ad buys. It’s also a little ironic that they’re spending money on advertising to newsjack a comment about how they should lose government funding ;-)And like any good newsjack, this one is wicked timely. It’s refreshing to know that a big organization — and a non-profit one at that, which is typically thought of as restricted by bureaucracy — is remaining agile enough to newsjack. And they do it effectively. If PBS can do it, marketers, so can we!What do you think of PBS’ newsjack? Have you seen any other great newsjacks of the presidential debates?Image credit: EvelynGiggles Social Media Topics: Newsjacking, if you’re not familiar with the phenomenon, is the concept of riding the popularity wave of a news item for some kind of business gain. And what’s bigger right now — in America, at least — than the presidential debates?Well, as it turns out, Sesame Street’s Big Bird is a close second. That’s because the folks at PBS have pulled a killer newsjack, riding the waves of the presidential debate. More specifically, riding the giant tidal waves that ensued on social media when Mitt Romney said that, while he loves Big Bird, he still wants to cut government funding for PBS.What happened next was a veritable firestorm of support across social media, particularly Twitter, with memes and parody accounts rising up to defend everyone’s favorite yellow bird.But all of that came from other people. In other words, PBS had nothing to do with the outcry. Until now.How PBS Newsjacked the Presidential DebatesAccording to Mashable, PBS decided to embrace the firestorm and pulled the trigger on an ad buy on Twitter for the phrase, “Big Bird.” Now, if you search for “Big Bird” on Twitter, you’ll see a PBS advertisement. Take a look:last_img read more

7 Companies That Totally ‘Get’ Their Buyer Personas

first_img Originally published Oct 25, 2012 9:00:00 AM, updated July 28 2017 One of the first things any marketer needs to figure out is who the heck they’re marketing to. That exercise has come to manifest itself in what we in the biz call a “persona,” and there are some companies who have done an excellent job at not just figuring out who their target customer is, but marketing to them in just the right way.If you’ve ever seen a company’s marketing campaign and stopped to think, “Wow. They totally get me!” you’re looking at a company that gets their target audience, and how to market to them. (You’re also probably part of their target audience — but I digress.) It’s not easy to pull this kind of alignment off, so we thought it’d be good to give the marketers that are superb at it a shoutout. Plus, seeing how other companies match up their target personas’ proclivities with marketing activities should serve as guidance for those still trying to figure out how to create marketing their leads and customers will love. Let’s take a look at some companies that totally “get” their buyer personas!SeventeenLet’s start with a little bit of history, shall we? An article on The Awl about the history of Seventeen magazine — which was actually the inspiration for this blog post — highlighted the magazine’s target persona back in 1950. They created a persona named Teena based on survey data from teenage girls and their mothers during the mid 1940s. Here’s how they described Teena:Teena the High School Girl has a peck of problems. She’s what older folks call an awkward adolescent — too tall, too plump, too shy — a little too much of a lot of little things. But they’re big things to Teena. And though she doesn’t always take her troubles to her mother, Teena writes her favorite magazine for the tip-off on the clothes she wears, the food she eats, the lipstick she wields, the room she bunks in, the budget she keeps, the boy she has a crush on.Now, Seventeen has gone through many adaptations of who their prime buyer persona is — this is just who they were targeting in the 1950s. But just look how it manifested itself in their magazine:As you can see from the covers (or maybe not, it’s a little hard to read), there is a strong focus in their feature content on Teena’s insecurities and hang-ups — not that we endorse capitalizing on young girls’ insecurities, this is simply a demonstration, for better or worse, of personas aligning well with a brand’s marketing. For instance, they have content like “Diet with Ice Cream,” an entire “Boy-Girl Issue,” and a story called “Dates (how to get).” These are all things that high school girls are insecure about, and Seventeen channeled what was going on in high school girls’ minds to power their content strategy.AppleApple is known for their outstanding marketing campaigns, but it always seemed a little more geared towards the consumer marketing. No longer. Apple has refocused some of their efforts on a new segment of the market — the business professional who wants to use devices that make their job more effective and efficient. Take a look at an instance of this new persona focus in action in this iPad 2 advertisement:This ad shows the iPad 2 user looking at stock options, investment portfolios, and even images of the brain … a far cry from someone taking video of their family, or rocking out to a killer iTunes library. This commercial is far more akin to what a professional’s work routine might look like, and helps the business professional see how an Apple product might fit into their professional lives.MySpaceMySpace is back guys!!! Hard to believe, I know, because they had a big problem when Facebook came out. Previously, they marketed to people of all ages who wanted to stay connected on social networks. But Facebook proved to be the better and more robust tool. So MySpace redid their strategy — starting with their target persona — and began focusing on a persona that would work better for them: musicians. Many musicians got their start by posting their songs on MySpace, and with a strategy that gave musicians a better tool to market themselves, MySpace was saved. Here, see for yourself:The new redesign features “Listen Now” calls-to-action, thumbnails of album covers so people can immediately listen to their songs, even a feature that highlights events where the musicians are playing. The profiles also have a Pinterest-like set-up allowing viewers to see large pictures of the artist and all that they are doing, further promoting them and their music. This is much more like an interactive, shareable online record store — a site design that is much more appealing to that music-oriented persona.ZipcarZipcar’s main buyer persona is the millennial urban dweller. Zipcar’s services are typically offered large cities around the world, with high populations of millennials who either can’t afford a car, or don’t see the need to own one in the city. With its sharing-focused business model, users pay hourly or daily rates for user of a communal car, without having to worry about paying for things like gas and insurance. What a nice, unburdened lifestyle!When you look at the channels and tone that Zipcar uses in its marketing, it is obvious that this free-wheelin’ (pun intended) audience is who they’re targeting. Just look at this tweet aimed at the millennial world traveler, for instance:Or this tweet with the whimsical, and again, free wheelin’ hashtag, #thatswhereiroll:And the contests don’t end on Twitter — they carry them over to Facebook, too! Topics: In addition to being very responsive on their Twitter account, Zipcar uses it’s Facebook account to answer questions and host contests with its followers. Millennials in particular expect quick answers to their questions on social media, and Zipcar fulfills that expectation. To further appeal to this audience, they host weekly contests to give out fun stuff like free t-shirts and driving dollars. One of their current promotions even involves giving anyone half off Zipcar on Election Day to help millennials get to the voting polls easier. What makes Zipcar’s marketing effective for their persona is not only their responsiveness and tone of voice, but the channels they choose to focus on, too.Goodbye CrutchesOne of HubSpot’s customer, Goodbye Crutches, actually has four buyer personas! Andy the Athlete is an active 21-35 year old who has hurt themself in a sports related injury; Gerry the Grandparent is 55-75 years old, and worries about hurting themselves; Mary the Motivated Mom is 35-55 and has a full and active life, but has to worry about taking care of a family and kids; finally, Woody the Working Dad is concerned about being able to get things done around the house despite an injury. Take a look at how these different personas have manifested themselves in their blog content:This blog post, “Woman’s Guide to Dress For Success with Leg Cast,” is clearly directed at Mary the Motivated Mom — as is the CTA about how to have a great Halloween despite an injury you see on that sidebar to the right. If you keep reading their blog, you’ll find they have a fantastic mix of content that addresses the needs of all their different buyer personas, and they have the accompanying lead-gen content to back it up.JetBlue JetBlue’s buyer persona is the low budget traveler that wants a comfortable yet affordable solution to flying. They are typically a younger audience that likes to be reached through social media channels and, similar to Zipcar, expects quick responses from the company. That audience comes through in their marketing in the medium they use (Twitter, in this instance), the words they use (flying like a “boss”), and even the name of the Twitter handle (@JetBlueCheeps).JetBlue doesn’t just rely on social media to reach their audience, either. They’re leveraging email marketing to keep those “like a boss” campaign multi-channel!Procter & GambleProcter & Gamble produces thousands of products for households, so one of their target personas is, naturally, the person in charge of buying these items. Often this turns into a parent — particularly a mom — that P&G is trying to reach with their marketing. They did a particularly spectacular job with their 2012 Olympics campaign. Take a look, and maybe grab a tissue.In their “Raising an Olympian” campaign, P&G takes a look at the mother’s role in the olympian’s life, whether that’s bringing their child to practice early in the morning or helping them heal from sports injuries. P&G focuses the story more on the mother’s role in her child’s success, tugging on the heart strings of anyone who watches. Especially any mom who has ever gotten up at 5AM to rush their kid to practice. The ads end with “P&G: A proud sponsor of mothers” keeping the focus in the ad on their target persona — the mom who’s in charge of buying the household supplies.Want more inspiration? Learn about the things great marketers do every day in service of things like their buyer personas.center_img Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlack Buyer Personaslast_img read more