IMO, IPIECA to Hold Its Flagship Oil Spill Response …

first_img My location zoom The biennial Regional Conference of the Global Initiative for West, Central and Southern Africa (GI WACAF Project) will be held from the 4 to 8 November, in Swakopmund, Namibia, and will be jointly organized by the International Maritime Organization (IMO), IPIECA (the global oil and gas industry association for environmental and social issues), and the Ministry of Works and Transport of the Republic of Namibia.Risks of oil spills are presenting new challenges to the region, as a result of increased oil and gas activities in the Central, Southern and Western parts of Africa, so the broad objective of the GI WACAF Regional Oil Spill Conference, is to ensure an effective response to these challenges by promoting public/private partnership for effective oil spill response.Industry and Government stakeholders from 22 west, central and southern African countries (Angola, Benin, Cameroon, Cape Verde, the Congo, Côte d’Ivoire, the Democratic Republic of Congo, Equatorial Guinea, Gabon, the Gambia, Ghana, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Liberia, Mauritania, Namibia, Nigeria, Sao Tome and Principe, Senegal, Sierra Leone, South Africa and Togo) and several leading international oil spill preparedness and response experts are expected to attend the 2013 conference, which follows those held in Gabon (April 2006), Republic of Congo (December 2007), Cameroon (November 2009), and Nigeria (November 2011).The Conference is expected to focus on capacity building, under the theme “Oil Spill Preparedness and Response Capability in West, Central and Southern Africa: Sustaining momentum in a changing world of oil spill risks”. The main objectives of will be to:• raise awareness on oil spill preparedness and response issues with an emphasis on the challenges in the region;• facilitate information sharing and lessons learned in the region;• review the progresses achieved since the last regional conference; and• determine priority actions for the coming biennium 2014-2015 to strengthen oil spill response capability in the region.Discussions are expected to centre on key technical preparedness and response topics, including legislation, management systems, contingency planning, international co-operation, training and response resources.“The GI WACAF Project provides unique opportunities for governments and industry to share best practices and work together in partnership on oil spill preparedness and response challenges. There have been many great achievements across the region since the project was launched in 2006. This 2013 biennium conference is a key milestone and a critical moment to come together and review progress, look ahead at how oil spill risks are evolving and to define the next steps to continue achieving our goals”, said Richard Santner, Senior Advisor, Oil Spill Response, BP, and Chairman of the GI WACAF Project since 2011.The conference will provide a unique opportunity for national delegates and industry representatives to consider ways to enhance and strengthen their preparedness and response systems, alongside international technical experts. Delegates will also have the opportunity to comment on the progress achieved since the inception of the GI WACAF Project, and exchange their experience and best practices.GI WACAF ProjectThe Global Initiative for West, Central and Southern Africa (GI WACAF Project), which was in 2006, is a partnership between the International Maritime Organization (IMO) and IPIECA, the global oil and gas industry association for environmental and social issues, to enhance the capacity of countries to prepare for and respond to marine oil spills.The Project area covers 22 West, Central and Southern African countries and its main task is to organize workshops, training, seminars and deployment exercises with national authorities in charge of oil spill response, in partnership with local businesses. 此页面无法正确加载 Google 地图。您是否拥有此网站?确定 Print  Close IMO, October 24, 2013last_img read more

Moroccans Bank Deposits in Switzerland Exceed 1 Billion

Rabat- A recent report released by the Swiss National Bank (SNB) shows that Moroccans’ total deposits in Swiss banks reached $1.112 billion last year, the equivalent of more than ten billion Moroccan dirhams.The report shows that savings of Moroccans in Switzerland are lower than most Arab countries, except war torn countries.Morocco ranks higher than Libya at 642 million Swiss francs, Tunisia at 564 million, Palestine at 286 million, Syria at 170 million, Yemen at 148 million, Iraq at 99 million, Sudan at 39 million, Djibouti at 30 million, Mauritania at 9 million, and Somalia at one million. The same report said that the total wealth saved by Arabs in Swiss banks was over $46 billion, with Gulf countries on top of the list.According to the annual report, Emiratis topped the list of Arabs, with savings of over $14.5 billion, followed by Saudis ($10 billion), Lebanese ($6.1 billion), Kuwaitis ($4.1 billion) and Egyptians ($3.01 billion).At the global level, the UK accounts for 22 per cent of total global funds in Swiss banks, followed by Americans.© Morocco World News. All Rights Reserved. This material may not be published, rewritten or redistributed without permission read more

Boston Marathon bombing suspects Rolling Stone cover prompts anger questions over photo

Boston Marathon bombing suspect’s Rolling Stone cover prompts anger, questions over photo AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to RedditRedditShare to 電子郵件Email by Leanne Italie, The Associated Press Posted Jul 17, 2013 5:19 pm MDT NEW YORK, N.Y. – Sultry eyes burn into the camera lens from behind tousled curls. A scruff of sexy beard and loose T-shirt are bathed in soft, yellow light.The close-up of Dzhokhar Tsarnaev on the cover of Rolling Stone to hit shelves Friday looks more like a young Bob Dylan or Jim Morrison than the 19-year-old who pleaded not guilty a little more than a week ago in the Boston Marathon bombing, his arm in a cast and his face swollen in court.Has the magazine, with its roundly condemned cover, offered the world its first rock star of an alleged Islamic terrorist?The same image of Tsarnaev was widely circulated and used by newspapers and magazines before, but in this context it took on new criticism and accusations that Rolling Stone turned the bombing defendant into something more appealing.“I can’t think of another instance in which one has glamorized the image of an alleged terrorist. This is the image of a rock star. This is the image of someone who is admired, of someone who has a fan base, of someone we are critiquing as art,” said Kathleen Hall Jamieson, a communications professor and the director of the Annenberg Public Policy Center at the University of Pennsylvania.Public outrage was swift, including hard words from the Boston mayor, bombing survivors and the governor of Massachusetts. At least five retailers with strong New England ties — CVS, Tedeschi Food Stores and the grocery chain the Roche Bros. — said they would not sell the issue that features an in-depth look into how a charming, well-liked teen took a dark turn toward radical Islam. Stop & Shop and Walgreens followed suit.Tsarnaev is not referred to as Tsarnaev in the article. The magazine uses his playful diminutive instead in a headline: “Jahar’s World.” With cover teasers for other stories on Willie Nelson, Jay-Z and Robin Thicke, it declares for the Tsarnaev story: “The Bomber. How a Popular, Promising Student was Failed by His Family, Fell Into Radical Islam and Became a Monster.”Rolling Stone did not address whether the photo was edited or filtered in any way in a brief statement offering condolences to bombing survivors and the loved ones of the dead.“The fact that Dzhokhar Tsarnaev is young, and in the same age group as many of our readers, makes it all the more important for us to examine the complexities of this issue and gain a more complete understanding of how a tragedy like this happens,” the statement said.That’s little consolation for James “Bim” Costello, 30, of Malden, Mass., who needed pig skin grafts on most of his right arm and right leg after the bombing. His body was pebbled with shrapnel, including nails he pulled out of his stomach himself. Three of his close friends lost legs that day and others suffered serious burns and shrapnel injuries.“I think whoever wrote the article should have their legs blown off by someone,” struggle through treatment “and then see who they would choose to put on the cover. “The accompanying story, he said, “just seems like a cry for attention” from Rolling Stone.Lauren Gabler had finished her fourth Boston Marathon and was two blocks from the finish line explosions that April day. At first she thought the Rolling Stone photo, released on the magazine’s website and Facebook page, was of a model or a rock star.“All of a sudden you realize that’s the Boston bomber,” said Gabler, who lives in the Washington, D.C., area. “The cover almost tricks you into what you’re looking at. I haven’t read the article yet, and I know it will probably be quite in-depth, but my initial reaction is that the photo that’s being used almost makes him look like a good guy.”Rolling Stone said the cover story was part of its “long-standing commitment to serious and thoughtful coverage of the most important political and cultural issues of our day.” And the magazine has had plenty of covers featuring people outside the realm of entertainment, from President Obama to Charles Manson.Putting criminals and alleged criminals on the covers of major magazines is justified if they are major news figures, said Samir Husni, a journalism professor who heads the Magazine Innovation Center at the University of Mississippi. It’s digitally manipulating a photo that never is, said Husni, reached by phone on vacation in his native Lebanon.“They’ll probably regret it later,” he said of Rolling Stone’s handling of its cover. “Even if it wasn’t doctored it’s going to bring those negative reactions.”Hundreds of Facebook and Twitter commenters condemned the magazine. Many cursed. Others expressed sadness and still more vowed never to read or purchase the magazine again.Boston Mayor Thomas M. Menino spoke for them in a letter he dashed off to Rolling Stone publisher Jann Wenner accusing the magazine of offering Tsarnaev “celebrity treatment” and calling the cover “ill-conceived, at best,” in that it supports the “terrible message that destruction gains fame for killers and their ’causes.’”The letter goes on to call the cover an obvious marketing strategy and concludes: “The survivors of the Boston attacks deserve Rolling Stone cover stories, though I no longer feel that Rolling Stone deserves them.”What does the controversy say about the culture today? It’s a culture that has already produced an online fandom for the attractive young bombing suspect, including young girls calling him “hot” and promising to help clear his name. At his hearing last week, a dozen or so girls wore T-shirts and stickers bearing his face.Jamieson had this to say on that score:“If you took that picture and you walked into an audience three months before the bombing and you said, ‘Here, this is a cover of Rolling Stone,’ what would people say? They’d say, ‘Ah, a new artist emerges on the national stage and Rolling Stone is doing a cover. What is his name? Well I guess it’s Bomber.’”___AP writers Cara Rubinsky, Steve LeBlanc and Bridget Murphy contributed to this report from Boston. David R. Martin contributed from New York.___Follow Leanne Italie on twitter: http://www.twitter.com/litalie read more