Record new car market despite November dip

Diesel penetration reaches record high at 31.1 per cent of the market Private market rises for sixth successive month, up 2.1 per cent Market on track for record total as year-to-date registrations climb 0.2 per cent November new car market slips 1.5 per cent to 169,059 units ‘At the beginning of 2003, the industry expected new car registrations to cool, forecasting a six per cent dip on 2002’s total. However, a truly amazing market throughout the year has exceeded all expectations and the year is now firmly on course towards its third successive record total’, commented SMMT chief executive Christopher Macgowan. He continued, ‘A range of new models, good deals and strong consumer spending have sustained growth in the market although sales have cooled over the last couple of months. To reach the year-end forecast, 141,400 units must be registered in December, a dip of 2.2 per cent on 2002’s figure.’ Notes to editors 1. New car registrations in the UK are expected to reach 2.565 million units in 2003, 165,000 units up on the initial January outlook. This will make 2003 the highest annual market on record. In 2002 registrations reached 2,563,631 units and 2,458,769 units in 2001.2. Diesel market penetration in November was the highest on record, at 31.1 per cent, up from 27.1 per cent in November 2002 and 21.9 per cent in November 2001. Diesel penetration for 2003 is expected to reach a record high of 27 per cent.3. Full year private registrations are expected to be the highest since 1990 at around 1.25 million units.November 2003The attached tables show the registration figures for Great Britain, Northern Ireland, The Isle of Man and the Channel Islands in detail. Top performers by range and UK penetration figures are also listed. Providing the SMMT is acknowledged as the source of this information, the figures may be quoted. Substantial reproduction needs specific approval by the SMMT.DownloadClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window) read more